Why Every Small Business Needs a Backup and Disaster Recovery Plan

June 1, 2016 | Larry Alton | Contributor | Entrepreneur

As a digitally active business in 2016, you can’t afford to lose your data. Whether at the hands of a natural disaster, human error, or cyber attack, data loss is costly and extremely risky. That’s why you need a backup and disaster recovery solution.

What is BDR?

As a small business owner, you’ve probably asked yourself this simple question at least once: “What is BDR?” Well, the most basic definition is a combination of data backup and disaster recovery solutions that are designed to work together to ensure uptime, diminish data loss, and maximize productivity in the midst of an attack, natural disaster, or other compromising situation. In other words, BDR solutions keep businesses safe when trouble strikes
According to research by Security Week, the total volume of data loss at the enterprise level has increased more than 400 percent over the past couple of years and the trend doesn’t appear to be slowing down any time soon. With the rise of big data, cloud computing, and BYOD policies in the workplace, it’s becoming increasingly challenging for businesses to protect their private data.
IT Web suggests that the total cost of data breaches will be more than $2.1 trillion by 2019. This is in part due to the fact that small businesses don’t always take security seriously. They wrongly assume that it’s the big corporations that face the highest risks. Unfortunately, this is a false assumption.
A Verizon report says that small data breaches — those with fewer than 100 files lost — cost between $18,120 and $35,730. Unless these are expenses that you can easily sustain, it’s time to implement a BDR plan.
Five reasons why SBOs need a BDR plan.

How Our Growing Tech Company Stayed Open During Hurricane María

July 30,2018 . Dolmarie Mendez | Guest Writer | Co-founder and CEO, Abartys Health | Entrepreneur

As the leader of a healthcare technology company,I have the responsibility to make sure my co-workers and I are ready for anything, in both the best and the worst of times.
While having our company headquarters in Puerto Rico gives us advantages that I wouldn’t trade for anything, Hurricane María last September brought about circumstances impossible to foresee. Our building flooded, power and telephone lines were disrupted and supermarkets and hospitals were closed for weeks.
To put the devastation into perspective, Hurricane María completely destroyed more than 87,000 homes in Puerto Rico (with more than 385,000 other homes sustaining major damage). Some 250,000 Puerto Rico residents were displaced to the mainland United States, in some cases permanently.
One study from the New England Journal of Medicine said that Hurricane María claimed some 4,600 lives, though the authors added that even this staggering figure could turn out to be conservative. In terms of costs, it’s estimated that Hurricane María has cost more than $90 billion.
We were one of 10,000 businesses affected by the hurricane. And yet, we knew that maintaining normal operations in the face of such obstacles was non-negotiable, given the vital technical services we provide to insurance companies and medical providers. And while not every tech company will have to deal with the catastrophe of a hurricane, there will almost certainly be unforeseen obstacles that test every company’s resilience.

We’re in the middle of hurricane season again.

Now that we’re in the middle of hurricane season 2018, here are the lessons we learned that other companies facing disasters similar to ours — especially companies in technology — can do to “weather the storm” when disaster strikes.

Hurricane Maria Almost Destroyed This Entrepreneur’s $300,000 Franchise Investment. Here’s How she Moved Forward

Hurricane Maria Almost Destroyed This Entrepreneur's $300,000 Franchise Investment. Here's How She Moved Forward.

Post-hurricane, this Pita Pit franchisee in San Juan dealt with lack of food, gas, power and communication. Here’s how she used a new mindset to move forward

Hayden Field, EntrepreneurStaff, Associate Editor, July 11, 2018 Women/Entrepreneur

In the Women Entrepreneur series My Worst Moment, female founders provide a firsthand account of the most difficult, gut-wrenching, almost-made-them-give-up experience they’ve had while building their business — and how they recovered.
When Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico on September 20, 2018, it left almost insurmountable tragedy in its wake. Although the death toll is widely disputed, one Harvard study estimates a potential 4,645 excess deaths, and the storm likely caused between $40 billion and $85 billion in damage, according to catastrophe modeling firm AIR Worldwide. Businesses — and plans for businesses — were also heavily impacted. Valeria Quinones had invested $300,000 to open a Pita Pit franchise, and although her construction site wasn’t destroyed, she faced hunger, power outages and monetary losses. Here, she tells us how she used a new mindset to take her next steps and move forward.

You May Have a Disaster Plan, But What About Business Continuity Planning?

Written by Randy Johnston ACCOUNTEX

Every few years, we get reminders of how vulnerable we are to acts of nature. Events beyond our control, including fires, floods and hurricanes causing large-scale disaster, have been experienced in various parts of North America recently. Both man-made and natural events will occur, frequently without warning.

Randy Johnston is a top-rated technology speaker at the annual Accountex USA conference. Randy is broadly known for his Technology Update presentation, which he updates continuously. At Accountex 2018 in Boston, Randy will be presenting on Cloud Technology. Randy has expertise in technology, security, accounting, software and computer infrastructure, and strategic planning and management.

With technology, additional risks come from hacks by bad actors resulting in data breaches or malware infections, hardware manufacturer errors that lead to issues such as the Spectre or Meltdown processor exploits, and software manufacturers making erroneous updates to their software that lead to work stoppages. These events all illustrate the need for Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery.

Let’s separate these two concepts, try to understand the difference, and focus on what we can do to improve business continuity.